Pyle Street – North

Pyle Street

1st mentioned in 13th-14th centuries

Ford Street, being the street leading to a ford over the River Medina, also rendered in some old documents as Pile Street. Ford Mill was demolished.

1541-83 John Goter, Cottage
William Tollman, piece of land 12d
Univ. Lib. Cam. Krvs.No2047

 

1593-1608 John Goter, Cottage & garden
William Thomas
PRO E 315/420

Road names changed in 1861.

Junction with East Street (South side)

1          Frederick Guy

1          )

1a        )

1b        ) Demolished 2012

2          )

3          )

Community Health NHS

4          ) Demolished 2012

Fire Station rear entrance

7          Child & Adolescent Mental Health

11        CareWatch

Nos 12 to 14 (consec) form a group

Nos 12 & 13
Early C19 3 storeys No 12 purple grey brick with red brick dressings, No 13 painted brick with rendered ground floor. One window each, sash, glazing bars intact No 13, only one with them on No 12, moulded flush wood frames, block sills, flat rubbed brick arches. Deeply recessed
doors. 6 fielded panels, 2 glazed, No 13 modern No 12 which has plain wood case.
Listing NGR: SZ5016089126

12        Henry Williams (1889)

13

No 14
C18 2 storeys and attic, painted brick. Gable end tiled roof with 2 dormers, wood eaves cornice. 2 windows and blind one in centre, sash, glazing bars, block sills, moulded flush wood frames camber headed. Doorway with flat hood over supported on brackets.
Listing NGR: SZ4989789111 Grade II 1972

14        The Row Barge (beerhouse) first appears in the 1750 Licensed Victuallers List, but may have existed from a much earlier time as a document was found dated 1738.

1859    Joseph Cotton

1879    Philip Wimbleton

1889    Alfred Newnham

1911    Squibb

1939    Reg Peachey

1947-51 Albert Newman

The building in the late 1960s found to be backing onto the fire station in South Street, it being used now as a local authority department.

Private dwelling

AgeUK

 

15-16 Warehouse

16        Foundation Bakery (2014)

17        James Toogood – market gardner (1889)

18 )

19 )      Private dwellings

20 )

21 )

22 )

23        demolished

24        William John James – chimney sweep (1889)

25 )      Canning Day Ltd. – garage in South Street

entrance

26-27 Early C18 (The Dower House 1 and 2) 2 storeys cement rendered. Gable end old tile roof, saddle-stone and kneelers to gable end of No 26. 2 gabled dormers. High rendered plinth. 5 windows, 2 light casements with glazing bars, moulded flush wood frames. Paired doors of 6 fielded panels in early C19 case of panelled pilasters with wood cornice over. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

Currently used as a surgery Sandlford, Hooper, Terry, Orr and Mobbs. Doctors Surgery. (1970)

 

Victoria Methodist Church & Sunday School (1970)

 

29        Day Units & Clinic on side of

30        Chantry House

Chantry House and garden, “To hold the same for the maintenance, benefit and perpetual support of the new school” then built in 1619. The building was then let for the benefit of the Grammar School.

In 1724 it was let to George Deacon for 99 years, he covenanting to “new Build” the house within three years, and subsequently let to John  Fleming, members of the Trattle family, and the Rev. Francis Worsley.
No 31 (Part of Rural District Offices)
Good late C17 or early C18 building in chequered brick. 7 windows, one blocked, with original casements. Some have straight brick arches, and some are waved. Rusticated doorcase of late C18 with pediment on plain brackets. No 31 has wood C19 doorcase, reeded pilasters, frieze and cornice. Listed Building status 1 October 1953.
35        Alexander Mearman – coah painter (1889)

 

The Odeon was built in 1934. and opened on 17th October 1936 with George Arlis in “East Meets West”. Located on a corner site of Pyle Street and Town Lane, the brick facade was broken by vertical bands of white stone. Inside the auditorium, seating was provided for 742 in the stalls and 486 in the balcony. There was an unusual shaped moulding at the top of the proscenium arch.

It was taken over on 2nd January 1961 by Isle of Wight Theatres and was re-named Savoy Cinema. In 1969, Star Cinemas Associated Holdings of Leeds took over and it was closed on 18th December 1982 with Ray Winstone in “Scum” and Bob Hoskins in “The Long Good Friday”.

The Savoy Cinema was demolished in summer 1984 and Savoy Court flats are now on the site, with retail use on the ground floor. Remembered by locals as their favourite, it was the biggest movie house on the island. (Contributed by Simon Overton, Ken Roe; Cinema Treasures.)

site became Dabells’ furniture store 1994 closed 2014.

 

Town Lane

 

36 – Green Dragon was the favoured hotel in ancient days, built before 1777 a Mr Gregory became the landlord of the establishment at that time. The building was on the corner of Pyle Street and Town Lane.

Recorded in the Hampshire Chronical 12 May 1777 – Cocking May 19th and the following two days. A Main of cocks to be fought at Mr Gregory’s at the Green Dragon Inn, Newport, between the Gentlemen of the East and West Medina. To show Thirty-one cocks main and ten Beys for Five Guineas, a battle and a Hundred Guineas to the odd one.

From the Hampshire Chronicle 6 July 1782 – Ordered by the Justices at their Public Meeting at the Green Dragon Inn. July 4th inst., that Henry Harbour pays to the Guardians of the Poor one shilling per week for the support of his wife so long as she remains in the House of Industry, she being of insane mind.

Liege – Enforced Allegiance. Borough of Newport

I Richd Bassett, Esquire, one of his Majest’s Justices of the Peace for the said Borough do hereby certify that I have this day viewed the lead gutter in Town Lane belonging to the Green Dragon Inn, which was presented by the Leet Jury of the said Borough at the Court Leet holden on the Sixth day of October last, as a public nuisance, and that the same has been repaired so that all his Majesty’s liege subjects may pass without inconvenience. Dated under my hand and seal this seventeenth day of April 1809. Richd. Bassett.

1832 – Mr Robert Squire, Landlord.

(Isle of Wight Observer 3 January 1846)

At Newport on Thursday, after a short illness, Mr Thomas Guy, coachman and horse-breaker, aged 65, well known as one of the best whips in the island and from having driven the Newport Coach from the Green Dragon Hotel to Ryde, many years.

1852    Benjamin Warburton

1860    A stranger named as Tom Sayers who visited the Island shortly after his historice fight with Heenan, stayed for a week or so at the Green Dragon. Recoerds go on to show that in the stable yard “making up” to a heavy weight ostler, who seemed to be anything but comfortable, as indeed he had reason to be.

1859    John Adams

1878    Edward Morris

(Isle of Wight County Press 14 March 1909)

Green Dragon and Fountain

Insp. Cass then gave evidence as to these two houses, saying the former was situated in Lower Pyle Street, was rated at £14-10s., and rented at £313, and was fully licensed. The present licensee, Mr Reynolds, who was a pensioner, had held the licence since August last, but did not sleep on the premises. The house did a fair trade with soldiers and the working class. There were six other licensed houses within a radius of 150 yards and the Green Dragon was not required.

The Chairman said the Bench had decided to refer both the Green Dragon and the Fountain to the Committee at Winchester.

From Occasional Jottings, County Press August 1910 – The Green Dragon, with its spacious accommodation was the scene of many lively gatherings in the past. Hunt spreads, Country Balls, and rare revelries in “Yeomanry Week”. The famous old Tap Room, with its high backed oaken settles, where country folk “most did congregate” on market days, whilst “news much older than their ale went round.”

Isle of Wight County Press Saturday 17 May 1924.

Demolition of the Green Dragon

One of the oldest buildings in the town, the Green Dragon Inn, at the corner of Town Lane and Pyle Street, which is at least three hundred years old, is being demolished with other old buildings on the west side of Town Lane to afford space for a new road from South Street to Pyle Street. The Green Dragon premises, although only partially demolished have already yielded several interesting finds.

1832 oncerts, balls and public dinners catered for in assembly rooms attached to the Ggreen Dragon.

Date unknown   Westmore Ltd – furniture removers

From the 1850s the Green Dragon was one of the Inns frequented by the Carriers which provided a service to the community and also to carry products to market. In the 1860s Market Day in Newport was on a Saturday and a cattle market on alternate Wednesdays. These proved popular and enabled much of the farm produce and young animals to be brought and sold.

The site today is occupied by Pizza Express. (pic)

37        Ladbrokes (1971)

38        J Peach – shoeing & general-smith (1884)

 

40 – Kings Head Public House dating from the latter part of the 17th century and obviously very much a market tavern. The inn was used by the carriers and at times up to five could be accommodated with stabling for up to ten horses.

There was also an associated lodging house that fronted into South Street with a passage-way beneath. Access to the rear of the inn was by a gate on the boundary line, problems arose in 1904 when Mew Langtons, the landlords, wanted this gate closed permanently forcing carriers to bring their horses in under the arch at the front of the Inn via the entrance passage and main staircase and remove them the same way. In case of fire, also, the closing of the exit is undesirable as horses could be much better and more quickly released via South Street than Pyle Street.

As so often happens when business interests are at the heart (Mew Langtons were the local brewers), the appeal was not heeded, and the gate was closed, and indeed for some years, whilst horses continued to be used by Carriers.

The Inn wass the oldest licensed house dating back to 1698.

 

1859    Henry Atwell

1871    Henry Atwell

1878    Mrs Charlotte Atwell

1879    James Cox

1911-24 Robert Ratcliffe

June 1926 – A sitting of the County Licensing Committee was held at Winchester on Friday week, Sir Francis Gore K.C.B., presiding. The licence for the King’s Head, Pyle Street, in which case Mr W.D.Mathies, appeared for the renewal authorities, and the owners, Messrs. Mew Langton & Co, were represented by Mr C.F.Hiscock.

Police evidence as to redundancy was called, following which, the tenant, Robert Ratcliffe stated that he was satisfied with the trade he was doing. He had a Slate Club with 60 members, and good accommodation for lodgers. Mr Hiscock said there was no doubt that at one time the trade was poor but that it was increasing. The committee refused the renewal of the licence.

Early C19 2 storeys painted brick. Gable end slate roof, wood eaves cornice. 2 windows, tripartite, sash, glazing bars. Moulded flush wood frames, flat brick arches. Circular window with keystone. Doorcase of Doric pilasters and projecting cornice. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

The site is now occupied by the Conservative Club as recorded in 1977.

W Whiston – cycles

Isle ?

41-42   Lloyds Pharmacy

 

Cockrams Yard

William Game

Newport Borough Corporation: Charters & Deeds.

NBC/1 c1180-1954; NBC/1/1497h – Agreement between the Corporation of Newport and Mr W Hobbs as to supply of water to slaughterhouse in Cockram’s Yard. Details filed 19 July 1909.

Cockram’s Yard on the site of a new supermarket uncovered pits containing medieval material.

Warehouse and Works (disused)

Carpark upper

 

Mechanical Institute of 1825

Situated in the Corn Market, it posses a decent library, and lectures are occasional given.

(see a history of the Isle of Wight County Library 1904-1979 www.woottonbridgeiow.org.uk/libaray/ )

 

44-46 Late C18 3 storey building in gault brick with banded quoins. Slate roof hidden by parapet and pediment in centre, moulded wood cornice, fluted frieze, 2nd floor block sill course. 7 windows, the centre 3 breaking forward, recessed, sash, glazing bars, block sills, flat brick arches.
Remains of C18 shop window frame, otherwise modern shop fronts but wood doorcase survives with engaged flute. Doric columns, plain frieze and modillion cornice. Listed Building status 1 October 1953.

47

48

49        Harry Williams – ironmonger (1889)

50 )

51 )      Upward & Rich –

Geo. V. Upwards Estb. 1703 premises in Pyle Street in 1920, then for over a century Upward & Rich wholesale grocers, provision merchants & confectioners traded here until 1974. The site was then redeveloped. to make way for part of Gateway complex. Now Co-operative stores.

52

53        Thomas Kentfield – printer (1889)

Abbey National Building Society (1971)

Books 2 Love

54

55

56

57        Mitchard C

58        Community Health Council (1977)

59        Morgans (1971)

Caffe Isola

60

61        Walk Tall

61a      M.G.R.Press – Printers & Stationers (1977)

62        William Mansbridge – baker (1889)

Way Riddett & Co. (1971)

Easy Weigh

63        Anne Blackton (1971)

Irvings – jewelers

64        William Barham – fish (1888)

65        W Fiander & Co – mineral waters (1893)

Central Meats

66        No.1 Wok

67        Hamiltons

68        Squires

69        K & D Island Property

70        Stanley Stevens Ltd (1971)

While-u-wait Service

71

72 – The building now beloning to the Salvation Army was formerly a Primitive Methodist Chapel, stands on land at one time belonging to Lord Culpepper, Lord of the Manor of Arreton.

73

74

75

76

77

78

79 – White Hart – This was an old inn dating from the early part of the 19th century which closed around 1909, the three storey building was still standing up until the early 1970s when wholsale demolition and redevelopment took place of it and adjoinging building between Pyle Street and Scarrots Lane.

1820 February 29 Mortgage of Messuage, tenement and dwelling house sometime erected and built by John Barnes with outhouses, yard and garden on south end of an d towards the upper end of Pyle Street into Scarrots Lane, which premises are now used as a victualling house called the White Hart and now in the occupation of Isaac Cook.

1859    James Tribbeck

1867    Peter Healy

1878    John Muffin

1879    Fred Sewell

1899    Frederick Cross

 

81 – Early C19 3 storeys painted brick. Low pitch gable end slate roof.Shallow wood eaves cornice, one window, recessed, sash, glazing bars intact 1st floor, flat brick arches, block sills. Mid C19 frame of shop front with Doric pilasters, fascia and cornice. 3 light window. Later door, blind rectangular fanlight. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

 

82 – Early C19 2 storeys stucco. Low pitch gable end slate roof behind parapet and block cornice, ground floor cornice, plinth. One window sash in moulded flush wood frame. Ground floor window plate glass but with moulded wood frame. Door with moulded wood case and hood over. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

 

83 – Early C19 5 storeys chequered brick with red brick dressings. Low pitch gable end slate roof with shallow wood eaves cornice. One window, recessed, sash, glazing bars intact 2nd floor, block sills, flat brick arches. Recessed door of 6 fielded panels, 2 glazed, wood case of thin pilaster strips and bracketed hood. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

 

Nos 86 to 90 (consec) form a group

86-89 C18/C19 row of cottages 2 storeys red brick. Gable end old tile roofs, slate No 86. Shallow wood eaves cornice. One window each sash, glazing bars intact Nos 87, 88 and 89 which has 2 light casement, moulded flush wood architraves, thin wood block sills. No 87 has shallow bay window on brackets, ground floor, with frieze and cornice. No 89 has ground floor bow window, glazing bars frieze and cornice. Recessed doors of 4 fielded panels, 2 glazed in Nos 87 and 89. No 86
has case of panelled pilasters, frieze and cornice over, plain wood case and cornice No 87, moulded wood cases Nos 88 and 89. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

90 – Early C19 3 storeys red brick. Low pitch hipped slate roof, shallow wood eaves cornice. One window, sash, glazing bars, moulded flush wood frames. Frame of contemporary shop front with frieze and cornice carried round corner on New Street front with Doric pilasters. Door in moulded wood case with frieze and dentil cornice over. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

86

87        Miss Angelica Colson – grocer (1920)

88 )

89 )      Fernando’s Oriental Store

No 90
Early C19 3 storeys red brick. Low pitch hipped slate roof, shallow wood
eaves cornice. One window, sash, glazing bars, moulded flush wood frames.
Frame of contemporary shop front with frieze and cornice carried round
corner on New Street front with Doric pilasters. Door in moulded wood
case with frieze and dentil cornice over.
Listing NGR: SZ4968489015 Grade II 1972

90        Cobb Financial Services

 

91-94 Late C18 2 storeys stucco front. Gable end old tile roof, hidden by stucco parapet and block cornice, block string course. Dormers to Nos 92, 93, 94. 2 windows per house, recessed, sash, block sills. No 91 has good mid C19 shop front, window of 4 lights, vertical glazing bars. Doric pilasters supporting frieze and cornice, door angled at corner, cornice and frieze projecting over. No 92 has one ground floor window, recessed door of 6 fielded panels, 2 glazed, wood case of thin Doric pilasters, bracketed hood. Nos 93, 94, have modern shop fronts.
Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

91        Diva

92        Ace Shoe Repairs

93        A B Wadham (Rentals) Ltd (1971)

94

 

Junction of Pyle Street; Carisbrooke Road and High Street. A old water trough stands here.

At the junction of High Street and Pyle Street, just inside the gate on the road to Carisbrooke was a cattle pound.

 

95 – C17 house with late C18 facade of purple grey headers with red brick dressings, stone rubble sides of same type as Garden Wall of Almshouses qv to west (61A). 2 storeys and attic. Gable end old tile roof, gable to street with brick coping, red brick cornice and block string course, rubble plinth, one window in gable, sash, glazing bars, moulded flush wood frame, block sill. 1st floor blind window and early C19 bay of 3 lights, glazing bars, moulded frames, frieze and projecting cornice, grooved apron. Ground floor window with glazing bars as in attic. C19 recessed door with plain reveals, plain wood case, bracketed hood. 2 rendered steps. Listed Building status 1 February 1972.

95        Roman Catholic Church of St Thomas of Canterbury
Dated 1791. at a cost of £3000, having been built by Mrs Eleizabeth Heneage: daughter and heiress of John Brown esq, late of Gatcombe. An unusual date for such a church of this denomination, but containing almost all the original details. Brick front to street of 2 storeys, with a band at sills and cornice. Small modillion pediment containing a rusticated round lunette. 3 windows (centre blocked) with round heads and no glazing bars. The side elevation has 5 stucco keystones. Round headed double doors, and rectangular porch in Roman Doric. Interior retains galleries on composite columns, good contemporary altar rails, coved altar recess and font with cover, and is quite outstanding of its kind.  Listed Building status 1 October 1953.

 

96        The Presbytery, originally a private house is mid c18. Seven-bay brick frontage, its windows irregularly disposed.

98        Newport Congregational Church

99        Miss Sarah Morris – dressmaker (1889)

Mrs Sarah Morris – corset maker (1889)

100

101      Mrs Elizabeth Lowe – dress maker (1889)

102      R E Hayley – butcher (1888)

103

104 – Old Kings Arms Inn. This house stood on the west side of the corner of Castlehold Lane, but during the time when this public house was open, the lane was known as Paradise Row. It was originally known as the Rising Sun and in 1776, King George III. Following the death of that monarch it took the name, the Old King’s Arms. It can be traced through the directories to 1871 and there is a referance in Hill’s Directory of 1879 of James Cox, Old Kings Head, 105 Pyle Street. Thereafter it vanishes from the records.

1817 23 June   Old Kings Arms from James Cull to Benjamin Mew

1825    The Old Kings Arms. Benjamin Mew to Thomas Pierce

1830    Robert Dyer

1859    Robert Dyer

1871    William Dyer

1878    Harry Simmonds

1879    William Eckett

 

Castlehold Lane

112-A  Fred Morgan – house funrishers (1894)

Rear of British Home Stores

Warehouses

Barclays Bank

St James Square

Nos 113A,114 & 114A form a group

113

No 114
Early C18 3 storeys with stucco front added. Steep pitch hipped old tile roof, wood eaves cornice. 4 windows, centre ones tripartite, recessed, sash, later glazing bars, block sills. 3 only on 1st floor, cut off halfway by cornice and fascia of late Victorian shop front. Garage bay to east.
Listing NGR: SZ4989789111 Grade II 1972

114      Wood & Horspool, Wholesale and Retail Ironmongers, Horticultural Engineers,
Agricultural Implement Makers,

go mobile

Tri-first, Age Concern

Graces Bakery

114a     Early c19 3 storeys painted brick. Low pitch gable end slate roof, wood eaves cornice. 3 windows, rectangular, glazing bars, moulded flush wood frames, thin block sills, camber headed on 1st floor with segmental brick arches. Ground floor mid C19 frame of shop front with frieze and cornice, Doric panelled pilasters.
Listing NGR: SZ4991089106 Grade II 1972

115      Star & Garter once belonged to John Brett, brewer, in 1768. As that fact is evident from his will, it is obvious it was in existance for a long time before. In 1785 it was owned by John Haddon, brewer and in 1826 conveyed to John William

1768    John Brett

1785    John Haddon

1826    John William Ffiel

Prior to Samuel Guy taking over the premises as a corn and seed merchant in 1867, it was run by a family of Beard. The present building dates from 1937, it subsequent closed in the early 2000s and is now Love Coffee. (pic)

No 116
Mid C18. 3 storeys red brick. The 1st and 2nd floors are part of the Wheatsheaf Hotel No 16 St Thomas’ssouare qv. Gable end old tile roof, wood eaves cornice. 4 windows, sash, with moulded flush wood frames, block sills. Modern shop front.
Listing NGR: SZ4992789098 Grade II 1972

116      Daish & Co – tailors (1904)

H Flack (1971)

 

St Thomas’s Square

 

117      The Rose & Crown – see entry in St Thomas’s Square

Moulin Rouge

Olivo

Lane to St Thomas Sq

 

122      Architect & Surveyor

Credit Union – closed

Hannah’s Cakes

Holyrood House

Brannon House

Isle of Wight County Press Office and Printing Works

123      Shop

 

Victoria Methodist Chapel shall be amended to read
The descriptic notes should be amended to read:

Nos 124 to 127 (consec) and the Apollo Theatre form a group
1804 enlarged 1833. 2 storeys red brick with deep red brick dressings, 3 bays, the centre one slightly recessed and breaking right up into full width pediment, with deep red brick relieving arch. Pediment has paired flat modillions, 3 round headed windows with glazing bars block sills, semi circular lunette above centre one in pediment. Block string course. Central double doors of 6 fielded panels, semi circular fanlight flanked by fluted Greek Doric columns. Frieze and cornice, probably of 1833. Later C19 cast iron railings on stone to street.
Apollo Theatre (formerly listed as Victoria Methodist Chapel).

1804 enlarged 1833. 2 storeys red brick with deep red brick dressings, 3 bays, the centre one slightly recessed and breaking right up into full width pediment, with deep red brick relieving arch. Pediment has paired flat modillions, 3 round headed windows with glazing bars block sills,
semi circular lunette above centre one in pediment. Block string course. Central double doors of 6 fielded panels, semi circular fanlight flanked by fluted Greek Doric columns. Frieze and cornice, probably of 1833. Interior has panelled gallery on cast iron columns. Semi circular apse at north end flanked by Doric pilasters. Preacher’s gallery with good turned balusters, bowed out in centre supported on fanned brackets. Bowed dais with turned balusters. Late C19 pews. Later C19 cast iron railings on stone base to street.
Nos 124 to 127 (consec) and the Methodist Chapel form a group Listed Building status 1 October 1953.

In 1967, John and Patricia Hancock had moved to the Isle of Wight from Birmingham, where they were active members of a Little Theatre – an amateur group that owned its own premises. When a Victorian Methodist church came up for sale in Pyle Street, Newport, two months before the Moon landing, John quickly saw the potential to create a Little Theatre on the Island.

Thanks to his drive and energy and commitment, the money was raised to buy the church in May 1970. But it was a close run thing: the Apollo won with an offer just £65 more than its rival. A small army of volunteers – some of whom are still with the Apollo, forty years on – worked all hours to convert the building, and the Apollo Theatre opened its doors in April 1972 with a trial run of plays, music and an art exhibition. Apollo Theatre informed of listed building status grade II* in 1972.

History

 

Nos 124 & 125
C18 one building. 2 storeys painted brick and cement rendering. Gable end old tile roof. 2 dormers, moulded brick eaves cornice. 3 and 4 windows, recessed, sash, glazing bars to No 125 only. Keystones. No 124 has recessed door of 3 fielded panels, rectangular fanlight No 125 has a recessed door of 5 fielded panels, doorcase of reeded Doric pilasters, frieze and cornice. Plinth. Listed building 1 October 1953

124      Hancock House – Apollo Theatre extension purchased 1992
125      Orme House

127      Thomas & Co – corn millers & merchants (1900’s)

The beauty Spot

128      Granary Court

129      Couture

131 rear of QS

132 )    Alveston Mews, flats

133 )

134A

134

entrance to parking

136      Harrison Black

A W Rose & Co Ltd

Hillmere Martin Ltd

entrance to parking

Nos 137 to 139 (consec) form a group

No 137 Pyle House (pic)
Late C18 purple grey brick with red brick dressings. 2 storeys. Gable end slate roof with 2 dormers, shallow wood eaves cornice, block sill course. 5 windows, sash, no glazing bars, moulded flush wood frames, block sills, flat brick arches. Central door of 6 fielded panels recessed with reeded reveals and doorcase of reeded pilasters, frieze and projecting cornice hood. Blind bay to west with side door of 4 fielded panels. 2 steps down.
Grade II 1 October 1953.

H Paul & Son (Coach Tours) Ltd

Hutchinson Harrison (1971)

Harrison Black

Nos 138 & 139
C18 pair of cottages, 2 storeys, chequered brick with red brick dressings, high rendered plinth. Gable end old tile roof, 2 dormers. One window per house, sash, moulded flush wood frames, block sills. Recessed doors of 6 panels, 2 glazed, segmental brick arches, stone steps. Listed building 1 February 1972.

139 )

138 )    Private dwellings

Langley Court

Charles Stanley

Rear entrance to Police Car Park

144

145

146

Junction with East street