Parish of Carisbrooke – Newport & Borough

Carisbrooke

Carisbrooke Road or The Mall

History of development The current road network and many of the buildings in existence today were in place by 1862, although several of the buildings along Castle Road date from the late 18th century. The vast majority of properties had been built by the turn of the 20th century (according to the 1862 and 1898 edition of the Ordnance Survey map). Archaeology The Carisbrooke Road area was largely arable farmland until the mid to late 18th century and forms the main link from the Castle to the harbour. It was therefore strategically important in military terms and may have had its own small scale defences. This is mirrored by the presence of World War Two anti tank defences at the convergence of Castle Road and Carisbrooke Road. Setting The area is bound nearly wholly by residential development: mainly in the form of semi-detached and terraced properties. Larger scale, detached and semi-detached housing occupies land further out to the north and south, where recreational space is also evident. The northern boundary of the area marks the edge of the historic residential quarter and the beginning of the town’s retail core. Materials The common roofing material is grey slate although clay tiles are evident on some of the earlier cottages. Although red and grey brick is used across the area, specific brickwork and wall treatments define particular stretches. Yellow brick is the dominant material for the villas and their associated front garden walls. Painted stucco is wholly used along the upper side of The Mall (in a variety of creams and pastel colours), whilst Castle Road makes use of painted brick and render for many of its buildings: colours varying from Newport Conservation Area – Appraisal 12 www.iwight.com/conservation Adopted 11 September 2007 cream to pastel green. The use of stone on boundary walls and the retaining wall along The Mall is a feature of the area. Height, mass & form The predominant form is of terraces with small front gardens and thus narrow plot widths. Bay windows are common and are of vertical proportions. Towards the southern end of the conservation area this regular pattern is replaced by a row of large detached villas, set back from the footway behind long driveways and front gardens. Most buildings at the southerly end of the conservation area are 2-3 storeys high. At the northerly end of the road, where the housing nears the retail centre, this increases to between 3-4 storeys. Pitched roofs are prevalent across the area. Typical Details and the Quality of Buildings Pitched roofs and chimneys are commonplace. The green and white painted iron railings along The Mall are an important feature of the area (as they are along St John’s Road), contributing positively to the early to mid-19th century 3-storey buildings that they front. Bay (both bow and square) and sliding sash windows are widespread, and are generally painted white. The majority of doors are panelled and fanlights are a common feature. Many of the late Regency/early Victorian terraces have ironwork balconies, typical of the period. Public Realm The artisan terraces along the southern end of the character area are very tightly formed. Much of the built environment is complemented however by a spacious street scene: a wide, raised pavement lines The Mall. Although many houses in the area retain traditional stone entrance steps, all the footways are concrete paved. The roads are of simple black top and the curbs of pre-cast concrete. The trees along The Mall are bordered at their base by surround detail headed brickwork. Trees and green space A small but important green, separating Castle Road from Carisbrooke Road, provides an open setting for the on looking houses in the south of the area. Small front gardens and a line of evenly spaced trees along the Mall soften the urban character. Views and Vistas Long views of the artisan terraces along Castle Road can be seen from the Carisbrooke Road/Castle Road junction. Similarly, the wide pavement along the northern side of Carisbrooke Road allows for lengthy views of The Mall and its line of terraces. Several narrow roads offshoot The Mall: from Cavendish Place, Field Place and Portland Street significant glimpses of the late Regency/early Victorian terraces along The Mall are caught. Views from The Mall out towards the shops along the top of the High Street highlight the change in character between the residential quarter and the commercial town centre. Sound and smell The sound of traffic and pedestrians chatting, and the smell of vehicular fumes is particularly noticeable at the beginning and end of the school and working day. Newport Conservation Area – Appraisal 13 www.iwight.com/conservation Adopted 11 September 2007 Activity and Uses At peak times (the beginning and end of the school and working day) Carisbrooke Road is heavily congested with buses and cars and the pavements are crowded with school children. With several nearby pubs and nightclubs the residential area experiences a rise in the volume of people walking home from the town centre on weekend nights. Positive elements • The green and white railings along The Mall. • The line of trees along The Mall. • The raised pavement along the Mall. • The continuity of bay windows and panelled doors. • The decorative eaves (lion sculptures) on certain buildings. • The plethora of listed buildings. • The open green at the junction of Castle Road. Negative elements • The large scale blocks of flats. • Unsightly utility service boxes. • Much of the tarmac surfacing along the Mall is in poor condition: it is very patchy in appearance and displays obvious crack lines. • Concrete and fence panelled front boundary walls. • Rows of garages around the backs of properties which are visible from the street. • Loss of traditional doors and windows in artisan terraces.

CASTLE ROAD
(South East Side)

Nos 1 to 5 (odd) Melbourne Street,
C18/C19 row of houses, No 1 is of 3 storeys in gault brick. Gable end slate roof. 2 windows, glazing bars. Ground floor windows: wood cornices and Venetian shutters. Recessed door with panelled reveals wood trellis porch.

Falcon Inn, Castle Road
First appearing in the 1867 Post Office Directory and survived through to the 1960s
1871-1879 Levi SCOVELL
1915-1939 Arthur Thomas BARTON
1947 E FRY
1951 Edgar C JOLLIFFE
No 3 (Falcon Inn) is of 2 storeys painted brick. Old tile sable end roof. 2 windows C19 ground floor window and entrance bay.

No 5 is of 2 storeys purple grey brick with red brick dressings, cornice and parapet. 2 windows. Round headed door in plain flood case. Tile hung sides.

Nos 7 & 9
(Castle Road Post Office)
Melbourne Street,
C18/C19 2 storeys. Brick, gable end slate roof. 2 windows. Recessed doors with semi-circular fanlights. No 7 has small cast iron balcony.

Nos 11 & 13
C18/C19. 3 storeys cement rendered. Gable end slate roofs Nos 11 and 13, old tile mansard roof
No 15 destroyed by fire.
No 17. One window each and dormers, flush moulded wood architraves. Recessed reeded doorcases with blind semi-circular fanlights.
Nos 19 to 27 (odd)
C18/C19 row of cottages. Nos 19 and 21: 2 storeys painted brick. Old tile gable end roof. One window.
No 23 of purple grey headers with red brick dressings and one window.
Nos 25, 27 similar with C19 bays added.
Nos 1 to 13 (odd), Nos 17 to 27 (odd) and Nos 101 to 105 (odd) Carisbrooke Road form a group.
Grade II
CARISBROOKE ROAD
(South East Side)
Nos 101 to 105 (odd)
Circa 1820. Raw of 3 storeyed houses in chequered brick with red brick dressings. Low pitch gable end slate roof. One window per house recessed, sash, glazing bars. Plain doors with thin plaster strips to wood doorcase, bracketed flat hoods.
Grade II

CASTLE ROAD
Nos 35 to 43 (odd) form a group
No 35
C18/C19. 2 storeys purple grey headers and red brick. Old tile gable end roof. One window, sash, glazing bars. Recessed door, plain case and bracketed hood.

No 37
2 storeys painted brick under same roof as No 35. One window, recessed, sash, glazing bars. Good cast iron balcony and wooden trellis porch.

Nos 39 to 43 (odd)
C18/C19. 2 storeys purple grey headers with red brick dressings. Gable end slate roof. 2 windows to Nos 39 and 41, No 43 has one window without glazing bars, its doorway is on the south west side. Recessed doors, wood doorcase with thin pilaster strips, bracketed hood.

CASTLE ROAD
Clarendon Street,
No 65
Circa 1840. 2 storeys stucco. Hipped slate roof, projecting eaves. 3 windows, recessed, sash, block sills. Ground floor, 2 large projecting stucco bay windows of 4 lights (2 to front), casements with original glazing bars, to side, French windows to front. Plain strips with moulded diamond corner blocks, reeded frieze, shallow cornice. Entrance south west side, recessed fielded panelled door with 2 lights, reeded wood case with moulded roundel corner blocks.

No 87
Circa 1830. 2 storeys chequer brick with red brick dressings. Low pitch hipped slate roof, projecting eaves. 2 windows, one in set back entrance bay. Windows recessed, sash, glazing bars, block sills,
rubbed brick flat arches. Recessed door of 4 fielded panels, 2 glazed, flat brick arch.

No 97
Early Cl9. Originally toll house. L plan. 2 storeys rendered brick painted. Ripped slate roof. North west end projects in 3 sided bay. 2 windows on north entrance front. 2 light casements glazing bars,
block sills flush flood frames. Recessed door of 4 fielded panels, 2 glazed, plain wood architrave. North west bay one window each side, none to front, casements with diamond pattern glazing bars, flush wood frames, block sills.

No 99
Winchester Close,
Circa 1840. 2 storeys weatherboarded. Low pitch hipped slate roof. 2 windows in slightly recessed bays, 3 light casements, glazing bars, the panes with bevelled corners, thin block wood sills. Centred modern door. Glazed roof verandah with fret work eaves, “rustic” plank fence with alternating open and whole planks. Conservatory south west end, enclosed trellised section to north east.

No 103 Linden Road,
Mid C19 single storey lodge in Tudor style of yellow Grey brick. Gable and scallop tiled roof with diagonally set, ridge end, yellow grey brick stacks, Wide barge-board eaves. Flanking brick pilaster strips. 2 windows, recessed full length 2 light casements with rectangular upper lights, glazing bars, block sills, flat brick arches. Centred recessed door of 3 fielded panels and 3 lancets, rrectangular fanlight, flat brick arch. Broad shallow step, flanked by short brick walls capped by terracotta urns.
Grade II

Nos 105 & 107
Mid C19. Semi-detached 2 storeys yellow grey brick flanked by brick pilaster strips. Hipped slate roof, wide wood eaves cornice. 3 windows, 2 light casements in wood frames, block sills. Ground floor original French windows. Entrances to sides. Tent roof verandah on cast iron trellis pilasters.
Grade II

No 139
Mid C19 + plan house of 2 storeys and attic in gault brick. Gable end roofs with bargeboards and finials. One window to each gable end, 2 either side of north wing and one each side of south wing. 2 light casements with block sills and drip moulds over. Ground floor west front original French windows and 4 light bay window with slate roof and brick base in gable end. Tent roofed verandah with good cast iron tracery pilasters on west side of north wing. Conservatory on the south wing this
side.

CARISBROOKE ROAD
(South East Side)
Nos 69 to 83 (odd) form a group
Nos 69 to 79 (odd)
Late C18 group of 2 storey houses in gault brick, plain but with some interesting details. Nos 69 to 79 have gable end old tile roofs and are of one window, recessed, sash, most with glazing bars. No 69 has C18 1st floor bow window of 3 lights with a wire frame window box. All have paired doors with flat hoods and blind semi-circular recessed panels over each. Slate hung gable ends to Nos 69 and 79.

Nos 81 & 83
1.10.53.
Early C19 semi-detached. 2 storeys gault brick. Gable end slate roof. One window per house, recessed, sash, glazing bars. Ground floor bay window. Plain doors in a shared porch, above which, on the 1st floor, is a semi-circular window with radial glazing bars.

Nos 69 to 83 (odd) and Nos 87 to 97 (odd) form a group

Nos 109 to 119 (odd) and Nos 123 and 125 form a group
Nos 109 & 111
Circa 1840 pair of houses of 3 storeys red brick with grey headers and red brick dressings. Gable end slate roof. One window per house, recessed, sash, block sills, flat brick arches. lst floor rectangular wood bay windows of 3 lights, frieze, moulded cornice, flat roofs, panelled aprons. Paired entrance, recessed doors of 5 fielded panels 2 glazed, elliptical fanlights, red brick arches over. Grade II

Nos 113 & 115
Circa 1840. 2 storeys stucco. One window each, recessed, sash, glazing bars to No 113. Gable end slate roof. Recessed doors. No 113 has 2, one of 4 inset panels, the other later partly glazed. No 115 has 4 centred arched door, of 3 full length fielded panels, reaching up into square headed fanlight.

Nos 117 & 119
Circa 1840, similar to Nos 109 and 111 but without 1st floor bay windows.
No 119 has modern door.

Nos 123 & 125
Early C19 pair of houses of 2 storeys in gault brick. Gable end slate roof, projecting wood eaves. 2 windows No 123, 3 to No 125 the centre one wider, recessed, sash, glazing bars, block sills, flat brick arches. Recessed doors, modern No 123, No 125 has 4 fielded panels, 2 glazed, semi-circular fanlights with 2 radial glazing bars, moulded imposts and brick arch over.

The Bedford Inn, Carisbrooke Road
These premises still exist ( ) with the small Victorian wall mail box in situ. In 1992 a new glass and metal extension was added to the left of the building by Taylor & Co, photocopying & printing service. The earliest listing as a public house is that of a William Cox, Grocer & Beer Retailer in the 1867 Post Office Directory
1915-1951 Maurice ATTRILL
premises converted to shop.

Bedford Arms, Carisbrooke Road
Known to exist from 1859 but converted to a private dwelling in 1908
1859 William HOLLIS
1871 Mrs Amellia HOLLIS

CARISBROOKE ROAD
(North West Side)
Nos 26 to 80 (even)
Mid-C19 Italianate terrace, Nos 26 and 28 are semi-detached but in same style. 3 storeys stucco with low pitch gable end slate roof, bracketed eaves cornice. Moulded 2nd floor sill course, block string course above ground floor which has banded rustication. 2 windows per house, sash moulded stucco surrounds, block sills on consoles to ground floor window. Alternating fenestration to 1st floor of 3 light stucco bay window, or 2 windows with pediments one segmental the other straight sided and with cast iron bracketed balconies. Recessed fielded panelled doors with semi-circular fanlights moulded stucco arch on imposts over.

Nos 26 to 80 (even) shall be amended to read Nos 26 and 30 to 80 (even).

Description on this should be amended to read:

Mid-C19 Italianate terrace. 3 storeys stucco with low pitch gable end slate roof, bracketed eaves cornice. Moulded 2nd floor still course, block string course above ground floor which has banded rustication. 2 window per house, sash moulded stucco surrounds, block sills on consoles to ground floor window. Alternating fenestration to 1st floor of 3 light stucco bay window, or 2 windows with pediments one segmental the other straight sided and with cast iron bracketed balconies. Recessed fielded panelled doors with semi-circular fanlights moulded stucco arch on imposts over.
35 1880s Clement S BRIMSON – House & Church Painters

64 Alexandra Lane,
CARISBROOKE ROAD
(North West Side)

Nos 26 to 80 (even)
Mid-C19 Italianate terrace, Nos 26 and 28 are semi-detached but in same style. 3 storeys stucco with low pitch gable end slate roof, bracketed eaves cornice. Moulded 2nd floor sill course, block string course above ground floor which has banded rustication. 2 windows per house, sash moulded stucco surrounds, block sills on consoles to ground floor window. Alternating fenestration to 1st floor of 3 light stucco bay window, or 2 windows with pediments one segmental the other straight
sided and with cast iron bracketed balconies. Recessed fielded panelled doors with semi-circular fanlights moulded stucco arch on imposts over.

CARISBROOKE ROAD
(North West Side)
Nos 86 & 88
Circa 1840. Semi-detached. 2 storeys gault brick. Low pitch hipped slate roof, projecting eaves. 2 windows per house, outer ones in projecting hipped roof bays, flanked by brick pilaster strips. Windows recessed, casements with original glazing bars, block sills, flat brick arches.
Ground floor French windows with Venetian shutters, blind cases. Recessed doors, 2 fielded panels, 2 lights, flat brick arches. Joint tent roof porch with 3 wooden trellis pilasters, brackets.

CASTLE LANE, CARISROOKE
Castle Cottage
Early Cl9, 2 storeys painted brick. North front flanked by 3 sided bays which in their upper part are carried round as octagonal turrets. Ripped slate roofs, projecting eaves. 2 windows (to front of each bay) sash, glazing bars, moulded flush wood frames, block sills. Central doorway in bay with lean-to roof, projecting nearly level with front of side bays. Conservatory on west front. Casement windows ground floor of south front, segment headed. 2 windows 1st floor as on main north
front.

CASTLE LANE, CARISBROOKE
No 5 (Keep Cottage)
C17/C18. Perhaps originally 2 cottages. 2 storeys red brick with grey headers. Gable end old tile roof. 4 windows, late casements, thin wood block sills, flat brick arches of red headers. Red brick plinth. Modern door, but retains plain doorcase and bracketed hood. Modern extension also with gable end roof doubles original building and is in keeping with it.

CASTLE STREET, CARISBROOKE
No 31
Early C19 cottage 2 storeys painted brick. Thatched roof with 2 eyebrows. 2 windows, casements with flush wood frames, thin block sills. Modern central door retains moulded architrave. Rustic wood porch with thatched roof.

CLATTERFORD ROAD, CARISBROOKE
Roman Villa in the grounds of St Biary’s Vicarage,
Castle Street,
At the lower end of the vicarage garden is a Roman Villa which was excavated in 1859, only partially uncovered and now very much overgrown, though some of the pavements were roofed over. Of the basilican type, excavations are said to have revealed a semi-circular bath and hypocaust.
High Street, Carisbrooke
(North Side)
Old George Inn
Church
Cutters Arms
Red Lion Hotel
Castle Hotel

(South Side)
Waverley Hotel
Bugle Inn
Eight Bells Hotel

all from 1859-1861 New Village to Castle Road

Carisbrooke Road leads SW from the town centre – a fine exit, with long terrace of the 1860s on the NW side; three-storey and mostly stuccoed. Each house is two bays wide, but the first floor frontage alternate between having two windows and iron balconies, and single canted bay windows, creating an impressive rhythmic effect. (The buildings of England. David W Lloyd & Nikolaus Pevsner)

1830 Richard STICKLAND – Veterinary surgeon